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Tuesday, September 4, 2012

Quilt Walls - A Tutorial For A Simple An Inexpensive Quilt Wall

Quilt Walls help quilters audition fabrics, layout blocks, plan borders, and simply help make the quilting assembly process a much easier activity.   They can be made out of all sorts of materials and in a variety of sizes.  Today, I want to share with you insights on a very inexpensive quilt wall, as well insights on a few other tutorials for creating quilt walls.

IKEA has some hardware that can make it easy and inexpensive to install a quilt wall.  As I have limited space in my little sewing room, I wanted a way to have a quilt wall that was also easy to move as it needed to be placed in front of existing wall-to-wall cabinets.  This approach won't be appropriate for everyone, but I wanted to share it for those that it might help.  I haven't yet tested it, but I'm pretty confident this hardware would also work to hang/display a finished quilt too!

I'll admit my DH installed this for me, but anyone that knows how to find ceiling & wall joists and use an electric drill could easily do this.
DIGNITET Curtain wire IKEA Complete set with hardware and curtain wire; ready to mount to wall or ceiling.
Dignitet Curtain Wire is a stainless steel set for $12.99, semi-ready to mount to ceiling or wall (where semi means you need your own screws).  The Dignitet was installed a few inches down from the ceiling, on two parallel walls.

DIGNITET Support/corner fixture IKEA Provides extra support to the curtain wire. Makes it possible for the curtain wire to go around corners.

Dignitet Support $4.99 provides extra support when you are doing a very wide quilt wall (mine is at ceiling height with a width of 172").  As I was striving to maximum the size of my quilt wall, I opted to use two Dignitet support brackes (2 per package).  These were installed on the ceiling, along the line where the two Dignetet Curtain brackets were installed on the walls.  The wire cable that comes in the Dignitet Curtain Wire kit was strung thru the appropriate holes in the four Dignitet brackets and set screws were used to tighten the wire before using wire cutters to clip any excess.

All Dignitets were mounted where the ceiling and/or wall joists existed vs mounting a dignitet directly into the dry wall.  This will allow this curtain wire system to hold more weight, which will easily support requirements for a quilt wall and should also work for displaying a large finished quilt too!
RIKTIG Curtain hook with clip IKEA

Rigtig Curtain hooks come in a 24 pack for $2.99.  I used one package, evening placing them on the wire.

I currently have a queen size Hobbs batting that I purchased at Michaels, using a 50% off coupon for an out the door price of $9.  Due to the width of the curtain wires (mine is 172"), I may end up with two separate pieces of batting, each with a width of ~86" should I want more than one project on my quilt wall, or to help with king size quilts!  It was also easy to place the batting into the Rigtig Curtain hooks, but I may later stitch some fabric to one end and place this side into the Rigtig curtain hooks.

Total cost of this quilt wall using the curtain wire & hooks from IKEA, along with batting from Michaels: $30

Install time:  ~1 hour.  Most of the install time is spent is checking to make sure you are tapping into ceiling joists vs just dry wall, the rest is pretty fast!


Again, this inexpensive quilt wall takes up minimal space in my sewing room.  As I don't have a free wall, this is placed close to my wall-to-wall cabinets.  I can slide the batting on the wire to get inside of most of the cabinets, but as I don't plan on leaving my quilt wall up all the time, I'm happy with the compromise between accessing my cabinets quickly vs limited space in my sewing room.  Plus, the cost was minimal.

What do you think?


Quilt in a Day also has a great tutorial to make 4'x8' quilt wall panels using sound boards, headliner material and other supplies.  I really like this type of quilt wall, but unfortunately my little sewing room doesn't have the space.  



You may also want to check out my prior post about Portable Design Walls.

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18 comments:

FabricFascination said...

I am in the process of planning a quilt wall now. Thanks for the information. This seems to work well.

Mommarock said...

You have my mind whirling now. I'm wondering if there is something else that you can hang?? something with a weighted bottom so that there is tension? I love this, because I too have no wall space and the space I do have is a guest room, so I can't keep anything up.

CBH said...
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Dora, the Quilter said...

Great idea. I hope you'll let us know how the batting holds up over time.

Marjorie said...

This sounds like a great solution for you. I tacked the foam mats that interlock onto a wall and covered them with batting and have really enjoyed using that even though it's not as big as what you have. I think what you have would be great for quilt photography too - if one has the right place for it.

Marlene @ KISSed Quilts . com said...

Looks great

suemac said...

Sweet. I opted for a flannel backed vinyl tablecloth. I have a free wall so I can leave it up there full time. I used those 3m hangers to hold it up.

Barb said...

That is soooooooo awesome....I just know you are loving it.

Susan Entwistle said...

Great idea. I've got Cheryl Ann's design wall but it's cumbersome to put together and take down in the narrow area I use it in. I'm thinking about trying the one that retracts like a window shade but it's not that large. Your idea may be a good start and I could use the flannel form the Cheryl Ann. Thanks.

IHaveANotion ~ Kelly Jackson said...

Great idea!

Kelly

Anonymous said...

A decent quality flannel backed tablecloth works well for me. If the tablecloth is too cheap the flannel doesn't seem to be "sticky"/thick enough to hold larger pieces.

Anita said...

Great idea! Love your gorgeous fall batik leaves! What is the pattern? Thanks!

Abbigail said...

I'm like Anita! I love the leave blocks that you are making! They are beautiful!

LindaB said...

My hubby installed this very system in my " new" quilting room 3 weeks ago, and I love it. I have a youth bed size quilt waiting to be quilted hanging on it and the cable is not bending at all.
I have two installed on the walls of my room, as I quilt in the basement, and the ceiling has insulated tiles, which are not good for hanging anything. I put one on the wall behind my sewing machine, so I could hang projects underway, to look at as I puzzle through what the next step is.The other is on the wall that I look at when I walk into the room. That keeps the project on my " backburner" and keeps the right brain engaged in exploring ideas for quilting, color combos, etc.

Maria Kievit said...

Like this idea, too. I also want to hang it in front of cupboards that I need to reach easily, and my idea is one of those film projector screens but then only with flannel on the one side to attach the quilts on. Haven't looked at this possibility yet, and don't even know if it's available this way, but then you can pull it up, quilt and blocks stay on flannel, and you can get in your closets.....

Nina Lise@Mrs Moen said...

I have almost the same system - same IKEA hardware but instead of batting I am using a flannel backed vinyl table cloth. It's a bit on the light and flimsy side so I will probably try a batting or fleece instead. It can easily be pushed aside which was my main goal as I too have limited space and too much stuff in my studio.

Connie said...

What a great idea for a portable wall! I have just a small design wall using styrofoam and batting which won't hold a full size quilt. Like you I just don't have the wall space.

Melissa said...

Great idea. And with the fabric down, it wouldn't hardly be noticeable even. Would also make a good mini quilt display system.