> ~ Insights by SewCalGal ~

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

The Speedy Stitcher Sewing AWL

While the odds are you are more interested in sewing with good quality cotton fabrics for quilting, there is a good chance that you are periodically asked to stitch a material that is too heavy to run thru your sewing machine.  While commercial sewing machines are built to handle heavyweight fabrics, old time "awls" are still an excellent sewing tool.  As, some may not be aware of these tools, I wanted to share these insights today.



There are many types of awls, but the basic structure and concept is the the same.  An awl allows the stitcher to push a needle with thread thru a heavyweight material, snag a thread on the bottom, while looping the thread thru it to create a stitch.  While manual, it is very effective and an excellent tool for the modern sewing enthusiast when you are trying to stitch thru heavyweight material.

The Speedy Stitcher manufacturers an excellent awl that is available in a kit format, that will meet the needs for stitching a variety of sewing projects for heavyweight materials.  For our household, this has helped to repair backpacks, computer tote bags, and various canvas items.  But, the possibilities are endless.  As such, I hope you'll check out this video and the Speedy Stitcher's site.  You may also find a time where you need a tool to help you stitch with heavyweight material that your sewing machine can't comfortably handle.




Speedy Stitcher is also looking for those interested in becoming a dealer.  While I can't share the details, this sounds like a great opportunity that you may want to check out:  http://speedystitcher.com/dealers.html

I certainly think those that like to camp, hike, backpack, do sports, boat, etc. would certainly find having a Speedy Stitcher to be a handy tool to have.  And, it is also available at a very reasonable price.

http://speedystitcher.com/

11 comments:

Josie McRazie said...

Can I tell you I have something like this that was in my Grandmother's sewing machine cabinet and I had no clue what it was... now I know!! LOL!! I will have to pulkl it out and figure out if I can use it!

MC said...

When my dad was younger, he was constantly bringing me his outdoor gear to repair. I wish I'd known this existed, it would have saved tons of time and probably some finger injuries.

Jean said...

oh my gravy! I need one of these for my luggage. I have a leather handle that needs some extra love. Thanks for posting this!

Jane Smith said...

I've used them for leatherwork. They work great. I'm sure you can fund a youtube tutorial, if needed.

Jane Smith said...

I've used them for leatherwork. They work great. I'm sure you can fund a youtube tutorial, if needed.

teachpany said...

My dad's used one of these for years. I looked into it a few years ago when I was putting boat covers together. I had too many yards to sew to do by hand, but it's a great tool. Glad to see they are still available.

June D said...

What a cool tool! thanks for sharing this info!

Janice J said...

I bought one at an antique shop thinking it was old and looked pretty cool, but had no idea how to use it! Thanks for posting the video!

Cynthia Stockdon said...

Great info!

French 75 said...

I really needed this about a year ago when my grandson was in Boy Scouts and had 11 badges that needed sewing on to his uniform. I'll keep it in mind for the future.

Karen said...

IT's a great suggestion. It looks very much like the tool that is used in rug hooking.